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Wedding Email Etiquette

DO: Get specific in your subject line. Put your need there right away, whether it’s “Wedding Inquiry – Date” or “Quick Question About Seasonal Flowers.” Giving a proper subject line will make it easy for the vendor to nd the email later on and estimate how long it will take them to respond to it.

DON’T: Make the subject something generic like “hi” or “question” that will leave vendors confused as to what your email is about and how long it will take them to answer.

DO: Provide as many details as possible. Even if you haven’t gotten knee-deep into planning, give the vendor what information you have.

DON’T: Send an email asking for a quote and then leave out necessary details like the date. If you’re inquiring about linens, for example, you need to provide how many tables you have, as well as their sizes. Asking a photographer for their pricing without providing the venue could make them wonder if it’s a local reception or a destination wedding. When a vendor has to email you back to request this information it will delay the process.

DO: If you’re in the inquiry stage, make sure to research vendors before emailing. It will save both of you time if you know you’re seriously interested in their services. Then, personalize each email with what you like about their business.

DON’T: Send out a huge email blast just look- ing for prices. Of course it’s important informa- tion, but price shopping can be frustrating to vendors, and it may leave them not emailing you back. If you send vague questions, like “How much do you charge for weddings?” to a DJ with no information about location or hours, it’s hard for them to respond accurately.

DO: If you’re in the inquiry stage, make sure to research vendors before emailing. It will save both of you time if you know you’re seriously interested in their services. Then, personalize each email with what you like about their business.

DON’T: Send out a huge email blast just looking for prices. Of course it’s important information, but price shopping can be frustrating to vendors, and it may leave them not emailing you back. If you send vague questions, like “How much do you charge for weddings?” to a DJ with no information about location or hours, it’s hard for them to respond accurately.

DO: Use proper formatting, no matter how informal you and your wedding are. Leave spaces between paragraphs so that emails are easy to scan. Consider using bullet points if you have multiple questions. And, don’t forget the spell check!

DON’T: Send huge chunks of unformatted text. When the vendor sees it, they may click away to deal with it later because it looks like it will take them awhile. You want to make things as clear as possible.

DO: Remind them of your wedding date and location in the very first paragraph. It will put them in the right mindset to answer your question if they can visualize your event.

DON’T: Send a thousand emails with each small question. Try to package them into one comprehensive email every so often so that your vendor isn’t swimming in notes from you.​

DO: Give your contact information — preferably a cell phone number. Vendors like to be able to get back to you as quickly as possible, and if they need further information, calling might do the trick better than emailing.

DON’T: Leave off your last name, particularly if you have a common first name. Chances are you aren’t the only “Katie” or “Sarah” the vendor is working with this year.

DO: Be considerate of business hours. It’s fine to send a weekend email, but don’t get upset if it isn’t responded to until Monday.